Population Working in the Trades

Definition:

Number of people employed in utilities, construction and manufacturing (NAICS) 

Methods and Limitations:

Industry refers to the general nature of the business carried out by the employer for whom the respondent works (main job only). Industry estimates in this table are based on the 2012 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). 

This indicator tracks employment in the NAICS utilities, construction and manufacturing  categories. Categories are reported separately from the data source, but combined here. 

To ensure respondent confidentiality, estimates below a certain threshold are suppressed. For Canada, Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia suppression is applied to all data below  1,500. The threshold level for Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan is 500, while in Prince Edward Island, estimates under 200 are suppressed. For census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and economic regions (ERs), use their respective provincial suppression levels mentioned above. Estimates are based on smaller sample sizes the more detailed the table becomes, which could result in lower data quality. 

To ensure respondent confidentiality, estimates below a certain threshold are suppressed. For Canada, Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia suppression is applied to all data below 1,500. The threshold level for Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan is 500, while in Prince Edward Island, estimates under 200 are supressed. For census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and economic regions (ERs), use their respective provincial suppression levels mentioned above. Estimates are based on smaller sample sizes the more detailed the table becomes, which could result in lower data quality.

An economic region is a geographical unit generally composed of several census divisions within a province. While 73 regions are defined for the purposes of sampling, some areas are too small to enable production of independent estimates from the survey. These small regions are grouped with a neighbouring region with similar economic characteristics. In the case of Prince Edward Island, the province constitutes one economic region. For geographic descriptions of economic regions, refer to the Guide to the Labour Force Survey (catalogue number 71-543-GIE).

Some geographies have utilities employment data suppressed as it falls below the threshold.

Source(s): 

Statistics Canada. Table 14-10-0392-01  Employment by industry, annual (x 1,000)

 
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Population Working in the Trades in the Sustainable Development Goals

Click on the SDG to reveal more information

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

Roughly half the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about US$2 a day. And in too many places, having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty. This slow and uneven progress requires us to rethink and retool our economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

A continued lack of decent work opportunities, insufficient investments and under-consumption lead to an erosion of the basic social contract underlying democratic societies: that all must share in progress. The creation of quality jobs will remain a major challenge for almost all economies well beyond 2015.

Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs that stimulate the economy while not harming the environment. Job opportunities and decent working conditions are also required for the whole working age population.